The Need for Speed

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vinnie
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The Need for Speed

Postby vinnie » Sat 12 Sep 2020, 9:36 pm

Hello all.

I've had the luxury of working very close to home for many years. My trusty 2009 Kona Smoke has served me well, despite weighing what feels like 15kg (although I've never bothered to weigh it before). The weight hasn't been an issue because I've only been riding a short distance each way.

I'm now working 20km from home. I've never had a fast bike but I imagine that over a distance like that it's possible to save some time if I invest in my ride.

I'm a very sentimental sort of guy. My Smoke has been with me through 3 Around the Bays and numerous other adventures, and I have been monogamous that whole time.

My question: is it possible to invest in quality components for my Smoke and get anywhere near the riding efficiency of a light-weight commuter with drop handle bars that's actually built for to achieve a reasonable amount of speed?

If the answer is yes: Please recommend to me what you think is critical in my quest for getting speed out of a behemoth (BB, hubs etc). I'm willing to spend a bit to get a bit of speed happening as long as it doesn't start approaching the cost of a new bike

If the answer is no: Please feel free to recommend something that is fast with a decent level of comfort and with rack mounting capability

Sorry to be so demanding of your thoughts and thanks for your input, all of which will be valued.

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Claude Cat
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Re: The Need for Speed

Postby Claude Cat » Sun 13 Sep 2020, 7:29 am

It's really going to depend upon the commute - is it flat or is it hilly. Are you riding through wind exposed sections?
Looking at your bike specs according to Kona, it does run rather large tyres, 700x47
I think the only thing that's going to make it faster is running narrower slicks.
Removing the fenders will help a little, but less useful if it rains!
I doubt there's much else that can be done, the bike simply isn't designed with speed in mind.

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mtb101
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Re: The Need for Speed

Postby mtb101 » Mon 14 Sep 2020, 9:21 am

so you're looking at 40k a day ... 200k a week?, sorry but Kona has to be retired due to age, weight and low efficiency.

it's not about time, its more about reducing fatigue over your riding week. and the fact you can enjoy the commute as you'll feel fresher each day.

The quickest and most efficient way to commute is on a road bike that weighs say 8kgs, tubeless ideal, rim brakes or discs (not cable), get your fit right and minimize your carry, (i.e. stash clothes etc at work), no racks, no guards. Pick back streets and bike paths and the momentum you can get on a good roadie is just fantastic, remember you're doing this week after week, hail, rain or shine.

Plenty of options around for $2-3k - you can justify that cause you don't drive and that's at least a few grand a year if you did drive.

a new bike is ideal as you get the warranty and piece of mind that components are new and up to the ks you'll be doing. Do a search on bike exchange for bike options.
__________flow................___________

vinnie
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Joined: Sat 15 Oct 2005, 4:41 pm
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Re: The Need for Speed

Postby vinnie » Fri 18 Sep 2020, 8:08 am

Thanks for both of your responses. I think I have to reluctantly agree with you and, considering the fact that a new purchase has been approved by the wife, I'll be opting for a new bike.

You made a good point mtb101 about feeling fresh etc. I've managed to go fine for the first week but like you said, the k's add up and it'll wear me down eventually.


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