Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

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WarPuzzle
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Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby WarPuzzle » Sun 10 Sep 2017, 4:40 pm

I've been looking online for cycling shoes and pedals to match, but I can't find any.. I'm also really confused about the sizing for the cycling shoes. If someone could find me some that'd be great.

Road bike shoes / pedals (3 clip ins). I'm a size 14 US mens.

fixie
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby fixie » Sun 10 Sep 2017, 5:28 pm

Pedals are pedals, and shoes are shoes. The pedals known as "clipless" are of a variety of designs. Clipless road pedals are usually single sided and require a special cleat which has to be permanently attached to the shoe. So you buy the pedal that you like, get the compatible clips and then get the shoes that you like and bolt the cleats on. Now, there is one more thing to be aware of: some cleats are 3 holes and require a shoe with 3 holes, and some are 2 hole and will require 2 holes which will be in a different position to the three hole version. Some shoes are compatible with both styles. Confused?

Road shoes are difficult to walk in when they have cleats fitted, and some are downright dangerous. In fact it is possible to get cleat covers to help save wear and tear when walking with cleats fitted and also make it safer. To get around the walking difficulty, many do not use road shoes on a road bike but instead use mountain bike shoes with a 2 hole cleat arrangement and mountain bike double sided pedals.

Some sensible people even use nice big flat pedals which are truly clipless and just wear runners for cycling. :shock: :D Such people lead a dull life as they rarely fall off because of a failure to unclip. They cause no amusement at traffic lights, rarely break their wrists or their collar bones when falling off while stationery. I could go on.

Just go on line and search for Road cycling shoes, then repeat for clipless pedals. Then do some research at a forum like Road bike review or Road.cc and and get further confused as to which is the favoured system or brand.

Good luck.
Stay fixed. Keeping a cool head.

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Snuffy
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby Snuffy » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 8:38 am

WarPuzzle wrote:I'm also really confused about the sizing for the cycling shoes.


What are you confused about?

Cycling shoes have size numbers on them like any other shoe.....

Except that Italian cycling shoe manufacturers like to lie and they're often a half or whole size smaller than what you might be used to.

I've owned a few pairs of cycling shoes over the years and my broad experience with sizing versus what I would "normally" wear......

(in descending order of the number of shoes of these brands that I've owned)
Bont - slightly short, lovely wide toe-box
Shimano - pretty good on sizing
Specialized - slightly short
Giro - good length but narrow
Five-ten - so comfortable (these are not the shoes you're looking for)
Lake - slightly small
DMT - slightly big
Sidi - made for Italian pixies (short and narrow)
Gaerne - made for slightly larger Italian pixies
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parawolf
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby parawolf » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 9:18 am

I just recently cut over my old Shimano R300 45 which cracked carbon soles to new Shimano RC7 45 Wide.

I went the Wide because on occasion the R300 45 i'd get hot foot and would feel like my foot cramping due to width snugness... but the 45 Wide feels like a slipper. I miss the 'cat tongue' heel grip fabric on the R300 which is only available on the RC9/S-pyhre, but I couldn't come to the $450 price compared to $200 on the RC7.

BOA straps I could happily do without on the RC7 and tried the RP9, but the fit was off on the top strap and couldn't get it to work nicely.

I love Bike Bug stores for being able to try things on, and they are almost as cheap as the big-3 UK online stores that I buy locally nearly always now for so many things.
Buy a bike, park the car, ride your ass off...

weg

Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby weg » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 1:02 pm

If these are your first clip-in shoes and pedals you're far better off going to a shop; they will likely set up your cleat placement as well, saving you from injury.

In addition to the advice above, decide if you want road (3 bolt) or mtb (2 bolt). Mtb cleats and shoes are more walkable but road are generally slimmer and lighter.

WarPuzzle
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby WarPuzzle » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 4:00 pm

weg wrote:If these are your first clip-in shoes and pedals you're far better off going to a shop; they will likely set up your cleat placement as well, saving you from injury.

In addition to the advice above, decide if you want road (3 bolt) or mtb (2 bolt). Mtb cleats and shoes are more walkable but road are generally slimmer and lighter.

Thanks, will do.

Snuffy wrote:
WarPuzzle wrote:I'm also really confused about the sizing for the cycling shoes.


What are you confused about?

Cycling shoes have size numbers on them like any other shoe.....

Except that Italian cycling shoe manufacturers like to lie and they're often a half or whole size smaller than what you might be used to.

I've owned a few pairs of cycling shoes over the years and my broad experience with sizing versus what I would "normally" wear......

(in descending order of the number of shoes of these brands that I've owned)
Bont - slightly short, lovely wide toe-box
Shimano - pretty good on sizing
Specialized - slightly short
Giro - good length but narrow
Five-ten - so comfortable (these are not the shoes you're looking for)
Lake - slightly small
DMT - slightly big
Sidi - made for Italian pixies (short and narrow)
Gaerne - made for slightly larger Italian pixies

I know, but the ones I've found just have like "37", "38", etc. Is that cm, euro sizing, US, what?

weg

Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby weg » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 4:10 pm

^ Those sizes are Euro; 36 is very small. Online shops usually have a size chart giving the main comparisons but you can also google shoe size conversion chart. Still, each brand has its own last and one will suit better than others depending on your foot size and shape.

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Claude Cat
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby Claude Cat » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 9:53 pm

Snuffy wrote:
WarPuzzle wrote:I'm also really confused about the sizing for the cycling shoes.


What are you confused about?

Cycling shoes have size numbers on them like any other shoe.....

Except that Italian cycling shoe manufacturers like to lie and they're often a half or whole size smaller than what you might be used to.

I've owned a few pairs of cycling shoes over the years and my broad experience with sizing versus what I would "normally" wear......

(in descending order of the number of shoes of these brands that I've owned)
Bont - slightly short, lovely wide toe-box
Shimano - pretty good on sizing
Specialized - slightly short
Giro - good length but narrow
Five-ten - so comfortable (these are not the shoes you're looking for)
Lake - slightly small
DMT - slightly big
Sidi - made for Italian pixies (short and narrow)
Gaerne - made for slightly larger Italian pixies


Interesting. I have two pairs of shimano shoes (1 road, 1 MTB) and one Sidi (road).
They are all 45s and the fit is almost identical.

fixie
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby fixie » Mon 11 Sep 2017, 10:50 pm

I can empathise more with Snuffy.

Addidas Professional Road. "Size 44.6" Fit perfect.

Garneau RevoXR2 Road. Size 46. Fit Perfect.

Garneau Mountain Montana XT. Size 46. Fit perfect.

You cannot beat trying them on in the shop.

Yes, I have been riding for a long time. I have some Detto Pietro size 43 which are as comfortable as old slippers. I have some very expensive Italian shoes size 44 which I bought on line and they will never ever grace my feet.

My everyday shoe size seems to be about 44 but it all really depends on the individual manufacturer.
Stay fixed. Keeping a cool head.

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Snuffy
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby Snuffy » Tue 12 Sep 2017, 7:27 am

Claude Cat wrote:Interesting. I have two pairs of shimano shoes (1 road, 1 MTB) and one Sidi (road).
They are all 45s and the fit is almost identical.


I'll admit that the Shimano shoes I've owned were all touring or commuting spec shoes.

Maybe they make the last on these shoes a bit more relaxed... Or maybe they make their road shoes a bit more roadie-esque ;)
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GreenAlias
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby GreenAlias » Tue 12 Sep 2017, 11:50 am

WarPuzzle wrote:I've been looking online for cycling shoes and pedals to match, but I can't find any.. I'm also really confused about the sizing for the cycling shoes. If someone could find me some that'd be great. Road bike shoes / pedals (3 clip ins). I'm a size 14 US mens.


Hi WarPuzzle, I remember your thread about "New Bike". What did you end up getting?

IMHO for your usage you'll find that MTB shoes/pedals are most practical and efficient. The Shimano "egg beater" pedals - Perhaps the M520 - are very good. http://www.shimano.com.au/content/saus- ... edals.html

For shoes, yes - you will need to go to a shop and try some on to find the right size. Entry level or mid-range MTB shoes will be perfectly adequate, no need to spend big bucks on fancy carbon shoes. Let us know how you get on. :mrgreen:

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Snuffy
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby Snuffy » Tue 12 Sep 2017, 12:26 pm

GreenAlias wrote:The Shimano "egg beater" pedals


The what now??

:?: :?:
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Magnus tG
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby Magnus tG » Tue 12 Sep 2017, 4:57 pm

Snuffy wrote:
GreenAlias wrote:The Shimano "egg beater" pedals

The what now??

:?: :?:

I think he means the Crank brothers eggbeater pedals. From memory, Mr PN* used those with much extolling :mrgreen:

*where's he at now?
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WarPuzzle
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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby WarPuzzle » Tue 12 Sep 2017, 7:02 pm

GreenAlias wrote:
WarPuzzle wrote:I've been looking online for cycling shoes and pedals to match, but I can't find any.. I'm also really confused about the sizing for the cycling shoes. If someone could find me some that'd be great. Road bike shoes / pedals (3 clip ins). I'm a size 14 US mens.


Hi WarPuzzle, I remember your thread about "New Bike". What did you end up getting?

IMHO for your usage you'll find that MTB shoes/pedals are most practical and efficient. The Shimano "egg beater" pedals - Perhaps the M520 - are very good. http://www.shimano.com.au/content/saus- ... edals.html

For shoes, yes - you will need to go to a shop and try some on to find the right size. Entry level or mid-range MTB shoes will be perfectly adequate, no need to spend big bucks on fancy carbon shoes. Let us know how you get on. :mrgreen:

http://www.99bikes.com.au/bike17-cube-a ... carbon-red (I got a bit of money from parents).

And thanks, I'll put those on my list (tryna figure out how much I need to buy shoes / pedals / saddlebag and other accessories).

EDIT: Also, I'm thinking of entering into the cycling club at the bottom of my street, so would it be worth it to get a bit more expensive shoes and pedals for more aero-dynamicness?

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Re: Clipless Pedals and Cycling Shoes

Postby Toyopet » Tue 12 Sep 2017, 8:02 pm

WarPuzzle wrote:.......EDIT: Also, I'm thinking of entering into the cycling club at the bottom of my street, so would it be worth it to get a bit more expensive shoes and pedals for more aero-dynamicness?


Image

I reckon it's 'snake oil'.
Marginal Gains, if you're chasing them, can be found more easily and cheaply in areas other than shoes and pedals.

Best to start with basic SPD pedals and shoes.
You might like them and stick with them long term.


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