Looking for FASTER LADY BIKE! Thoughts on Trek Lexa???

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Keptek
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Looking for FASTER LADY BIKE! Thoughts on Trek Lexa???

Postby Keptek » Thu 23 Oct 2014, 8:50 pm

EDIT

My life has changed. I'm now commuting 2hrs per day and upgrading the bike is seeming like a much better idea! I no longer have to do mixed-mode, so I can start saving money on not buying Myki passes every month, which was up at about the $120/pcm point.

I'm even going to start wearing knicks : :shock:

I'm a bit f-cked off about the experience I had trying bikes which didn't fit so I am going to focus on the Trek brand which promotes its women-specific design, which incorporates fit. I'm keen on their Lexa road bikes, would welcome any comments about people's experiences with this brand and type.

Also can I clamp on mudguards and a pannier rack? Seems a bit desecration-ey but I neeeed my two massive panniers. :D

Old post wrote:Hi - I've had it since new and have been thinking about upgrading for a while.
I don't want anything too crazy-good, and I was hoping not to spend more than $1k. I don't want something that's worth stealing... this is why I've been unable to commit to buying a new bike.
It would be my commuter, I do ~1hr per day all up, and would need a pannier rack and mudguards and a kickstand.

I was looking at this, which looks nice http://www.cbdcycles.com.au/bikedetails ... =1610#.php

But I suspect I have to try bikes out to know.

Also I've had my current one serviced regularly and was wondering if it's worth trying to sell it.
Also the people who service it have talked me out of upgrading so I feel bad and it seems wasteful.
But then I thought, am I going to ride this bike my whole life? That seemed depressing.
Also if I get a lighter bike, my leg muscles will diminish because I will be moving less weight around, so it will make me less fit.

:|
Last edited by Keptek on Sun 22 Feb 2015, 2:23 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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gregaudio
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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby gregaudio » Thu 23 Oct 2014, 10:31 pm

A quick google image search on Giant Cypress shows quite a few variants but the thing in common with most is that the handle bars are set higher than the saddle, in most cases due to the suspension forks pictured. If yours is like this then it's set up more for comfort than efficiency.

Riding a bike with lower handle bars, rigid forks and skinnier tyres would (through several factors) give you a speed and / or effort advantage but could come at the expense of comfort in the arms & lower back. If you're a fitter rider now than you were when you bought that bike the change could be a good thing. You will probably notice the improvement with a short test ride but may not pick up on any discomfort until you've completed some longer journeys.

I would recommend you see if you can borrow a bike like the one you want to buy from a friend so you can ride it enough to find out if it's the right move to make.

You can always own more than one bike too you know :-)

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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby Snuffy » Fri 24 Oct 2014, 8:06 am

Keptek wrote:I was hoping not to spend more than $1k. I don't want something that's worth stealing...


I'm guessing this means you're locking it in very public places?

I suppose then that it's really a question for you - are YOU comfortable with locking a $1000 bike up somewhere where it might get stolen? I'm not really one for ugly-ing up a bike so that I can lock it up outside. Any bike I lock in a place where it has a good chance of being stolen, I'm prepared to lose.

Over the years, I've become less and less interested in a lighter bike, skinnier tyres or a more aggressive position. If you're riding an hour a day total, this is even less of an issue. Heck, I ride more than an hour one-way on my commute and I have ~40mm tyres and a 15kg bike.

Anyway, from what I can guess of your requirements.... unless there's something actually wrong with the current bike, I wouldn't change. (I lie, I would upgrade.... because I change bikes like some people change socks) But really, what's the point of this change? Are you hoping to go faster? Is the old bike uncomfortable? Are lots of parts wearing out?

For that money, I wouldn't bother with anything that doesn't already come fully kitted out with a rack and guards. Seems silly to buy aftermarket when there's stuff like these with all things included....
http://www.myspokes.bikeit.com.au/a/urb ... /102517799
http://www.stkildacycles.com.au/index.p ... ipped.html
http://www.stkildacycles.com.au/index.p ... 2-fem.html

With the change, bolt on a couple of Reelights and a decent kickstand.
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Helen
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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby Helen » Fri 24 Oct 2014, 9:11 am

Also I've had my current one serviced regularly and was wondering if it's worth trying to sell it.

Hi Keptek,
do the rims tend to fat or thin?
I guess what I'm asking is it a suitable bike for dirt roads and rail trails?
If so, what would be your minimum bid?
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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby bc » Fri 24 Oct 2014, 10:24 am

I've just replaced my commuter from a flat bar road bike to a cyclo-cross. Lots lighter, but I'm getting fitter because I'm riding harder, and of course because I'm enjoying it more and using it on rail trails etc.

Sounds like the current bike has done what you wanted. Are your needs/desires changing, or do you just expect to keep doing what you're doing?

My brother-in-law has recently got a belt drive, hub gear bike for cruising the bike trails - think it might be an Avanti Inc 2. It is relatively upgright, would be a comfortable commuter and he finds it low maintenance, but probably not as upright as your present ride. And just a bit over your budget (of course :) ). You would probably find it lighter/faster, but still relatively comfortable.

And bikes are not like cars, there's room in the garage for a number - commuter, recreation riding, event riding, etc

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baudman
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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby baudman » Fri 24 Oct 2014, 1:29 pm

New bike v upgrades? Only you can answer that, but generally new works out cheaper once you look at more than just a few things. You can sell - I find the easiest is to find a new home for it in your circle of communication/friends - in real life and/or facebook. (We have a buy swap sell FB site for our neck of the woods, and decent stuff at a decent price goes very quickly). I don't think of selling (or even giving it away) as a waste of resources, if it's going to someone who is going to use it. It's more, sharing the bike love.

If you think new - Test ride. Your budget is going to give you quite a broad range of options - even from any one shop/brand.

As many as you can. If stores don't like you taking a 15 min test ride, go elsewhere. (A circuit of the car park isn't really going to tell you anything more than if it sorta fits). Work out what you like in different models, and what your must-haves and nice-to-haves are in the bike. Guards and a rack you've said. Kickstands can be fitted to almost anything - but yes, you do want to ensure an appropriate one can be fitted. What else - Range of gearing? Thinner tyres v fatter. Upright ride vs more aggressive. (Drop bars vs flat/city bars too for that matter). Suspension forks? (Most would suggest if you're just riding in/around the burbs, all they do is add weight and sap energy).

Remember that saddles are an easy change. To an extent, handlebars are too, and they can change the feel of the bike considerably.

Your concerns about effort required? You'll find you'll probably use the same amount of effort - you'll just get there faster. That then gives you more free time - perhaps for some extended rides home ;)

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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby barefoot » Fri 24 Oct 2014, 1:37 pm

Keptek wrote:Also if I get a lighter bike, my leg muscles will diminish because I will be moving less weight around, so it will make me less fit.

:|


As Greg LeMond said... "It doesn't get easier, you just go faster".

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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby Keptek » Sat 08 Nov 2014, 1:43 pm

Thanks everyone for the replies. I ended up checking out the St Kilda Cycles page due to the links from Snuffy and I found the Allegro T1 touring bike discounted to $990 from $1500. It says good for commuting, plus has mudguards and panniers as standard, and the style turned my head.

Unfortunately, I tried their Small today and it's too big. I can't put both feet comfortably on the ground. The drop bars are probably just a learning curve but the frame has to be the right size. The frame isn't step-through like my last one. Actually, learning to mount & demount the bike will be a learning curve!

BUT it was really fun to ride - and I loved the way it looked. So I think it's a step in the right direction.

Allegro don't make them in XS so I'm kind of looking for a similar style in an XS now. I had a look at the Giant road bikes, but there'll be extra cash to throw at mudguards and pannier racks (and kickstands?) - plus I think I just prefer the way the tourer looks. Giant do this weird stuff with paint and tubes being oval and weird and stuff. I'm sure I could end up liking that, but not immediately after falling for this

Image

:cry: :cry: :cry:

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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby baudman » Sun 09 Nov 2014, 9:28 am

There's actually quite a few bikes like this, in this category. Probably not at that price bracket, however, unless discounted/on sale.

Did you want steel?

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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby Keptek » Sun 09 Nov 2014, 6:09 pm

Nod re: price point. However... If I have to pay a bit extra, it's not insurmountable. I've revised the budget to closer to the $1500 mark, seeing as that's the 'real' cost of the Allegro, but twould have to come with mudguards, racks and whatever handlebar setup I prefer. Those handy little brakes in the middle of the bar instead of having to reach round could help me on my learning curve.

RE: Steel
I'm guessing steel is this 'cromoly' stuff the Allegro is made in, and the other option will be aluminium (and then carbon fibre)? I have no preference as I am uneducated in bike materials! I tried out about 3 bikes and I could tell there was a difference in rigidity and weight... I reckon anything I go to after my current bike is going to feel amazing, so I'm not fussed.

I still don't quite get the difference between Road bike and a Tourer. A Tourer comes with handy useful stuff as standard, got it - racks and guards. But is there anything else??? Is that literally the only difference - a road bike is a 'bare' touring bike? If so... I'm open to road bikes based on my above proposition that they are the same effective bikes as touring bikes.

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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby Snuffy » Mon 10 Nov 2014, 11:23 am

Keptek wrote:Unfortunately, I tried their Small today and it's too big. I can't put both feet comfortably on the ground.


Are you referring to putting your feet on the ground from the saddle or your clearance over the top tube of the frame?

If it's the former, then that's not uncommon.... it's tippy toes for me to the ground from my saddle.

If it's the latter... well, then yes, that could be a problem.

Keptek wrote:I still don't quite get the difference between Road bike and a Tourer. A Tourer comes with handy useful stuff as standard, got it - racks and guards. But is there anything else??? Is that literally the only difference - a road bike is a 'bare' touring bike?


There's no hard and fast rule as to what the differences are, but the key ones are GENERALLY, tourers....
- Have a more of an upright position
- Have mounts for racks, guards etc
- Have more tyre clearance
- Are designed to use brakes other than road bike caliper brakes
- Often steer more slowly (ie more stable)
- Don't always have typical curly drop bars

These of course are just a general description and there are ALWAYS bikes that span multiple genres or are an exception to these criteria. The shades of grey between the black and white of "road bike" and "touring bike" are limitless.
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Re: Looking for slight upgrade on Giant 2007 Cypress bike

Postby Keptek » Sun 22 Feb 2015, 2:21 pm

BUMP

My life has changed. I'm now commuting 2hrs per day and upgrading the bike is seeming like a much better idea! I no longer have to do mixed-mode, so I can start saving money on not buying Myki passes every month, which was up at about the $120/pcm point.

I'm even going to start wearing knicks : :shock:

I'm a bit f-cked off about the experience I had trying bikes which didn't fit so I am going to focus on the Trek brand which promotes its women-specific design, which incorporates fit. I'm keen on their Lexa road bikes, would welcome any comments about people's experiences with this brand and type.

Also can I clamp on mudguards and a pannier rack? Seems a bit desecration-ey but I neeeed my two massive panniers. :D

weg

Re: Looking for FASTER LADY BIKE! Thoughts on Trek Lexa???

Postby weg » Sun 22 Feb 2015, 4:33 pm

Sorry to hear about your fit issues Keptek, although I'm not sure I'd be limiting myself to one brand. What you might have gleaned from the experience is the standover height you need for top tube clearance, and top tube length (normally the horizontal measure is more comparable).

Whether it's WSD depends largely on your proportions; some of the other 'womanising' elements can be swapped out anyway. If you know your preferred top tube measurement you can shop by that. Even though bike shop dudes will invariably try to put you on anything. Still, a test ride always adds to your knowledge base. Sorry, don't know about Trek in particular. At the shorter end of the curve it's not easy but worth the time to get it right.

To help with people's suggestions, how far is your commute and is it flat or hilly? And do you have a feel for tyre width you'd like? Most people get used to drops quickly so I wouldn't let that stop you but something like a cx/flatbar width around 30mm might be more comfortable as a commuter. If you're compact, bike weight is really important too.

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Re: Looking for FASTER LADY BIKE! Thoughts on Trek Lexa???

Postby Keptek » Sun 22 Feb 2015, 8:51 pm

-It's mostly flat but there are a couple of humongous hills at one end. Or it might just be one big one and another long climbing one.
-The commute is 15kms. YES I AM SLOW. But the new bike should help that!
-I don't mind about tyre width as I won't be mucking around on tram lines. The Trek bikes have been reviewed as good for commuting and some terrain-y adventures.
-'Womanising' elements, I hear you, but at the same time there was one bike I had -thought- I really wanted and was vaguely saving up for, but to be honest I had trouble reaching the brakes due to my hands, and the bike shop said the components were as small as they got.
-I haven't road tested a Trek yet so I don't know, but I've read reviews from women around my size who've bought them and rave about the fit. Their 44cm frame with a standover height of 68.6cm should be just about right - see 'Fit and Sizing' on http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/endurance_race/lexa/lexa_sl/#
-I want to try drops because they make you look cool.
-Can you explain what this sentence means? 'a cx/flatbar width around 30mm' That is too bicycle-lingo for me ;) Is CX cyclocross?

weg

Re: Looking for FASTER LADY BIKE! Thoughts on Trek Lexa???

Postby weg » Sun 22 Feb 2015, 9:31 pm

Excellent. :D So it sounds like you don't need anything special in terms of gearing; just low enough.
Keptek wrote:-The commute is 15kms. YES I AM SLOW. But the new bike should help that!

Truly doesn't matter about the speed, so long as it works for you. 15km is a good commute.
Keptek wrote:-I don't mind about tyre width as I won't be mucking around on tram lines. The Trek bikes have been reviewed as good for commuting and some terrain-y adventures.

Excellent; means you can keep your options open for the moment, so could be road or cx (yes, cyclocross) or flatbar.
Keptek wrote:-'Womanising' elements, I hear you, but at the same time there was one bike I had -thought- I really wanted and was vaguely saving up for, but to be honest I had trouble reaching the brakes due to my hands, and the bike shop said the components were as small as they got.

This could be about reach to the bars, or it could be the size of your hands with a large groupset like Shimano. Different things. At your budget, SRAM brifters (the gear/brake levers on drops) can be a better fit for small hands. And they certainly are more in proportion to the size of small frames. But it's not as common as Shimano. Some Shimano has shims to bring the levers closer, but that only helps with reach; it doesn't shrink the hoods.
Keptek wrote:-I haven't road tested a Trek yet so I don't know, but I've read reviews from women around my size who've bought them and rave about the fit. Their 44cm frame with a standover height of 68.6cm should be just about right - see 'Fit and Sizing' on http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/endurance_race/lexa/lexa_sl/#
That's nice, but what fits someone else has little to do with what fits you - your proportions, your weight distribution, your flexibility and your riding style. Hence why I'm more inclined to the specs than reviews, beyond them telling you whether it's relaxed or race geometry for example. One of my friends is the same height as me (well, she's 3mm shorter now we think whistles innocently) but we have very different proportions (short/long legs, short/long torsos) so we ride different set-ups.
Keptek wrote:-I want to try drops because they make you look cool.
Excellent reason. :D Thought about hiring a roadie for a couple of days? Then making a note of the things you like and the key specs?
Keptek wrote:-Can you explain what this sentence means? 'a cx/flatbar width around 30mm' That is too bicycle-lingo for me ;) Is CX cyclocross?
Sorry. Road bikes are generally designed for 23-25mm (width) tyres, but flatbars and cyclocross bikes will take up to 30-35mm. Fatter tyres are a bit more stable (allegedly over gravel etc) and comfy, but at the cost of some speed. You can think of the tyre as providing some suspension depending on the pressure you use, which can save you the weight of suspension forks. Still, I've found road tyres go much better than most people reckon over gravel and dirt though. ;-) Just handy to think about for the adventurey stuff you see on the horizon.


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